Inbound marketing vs. Outbound Marketing: Which is More Convenient?

Inbound marketing vs. Outbound Marketing: Which is More Convenient?

 

We have already discussed the differences between inbound marketing and outbound marketing. While outbound marketing – a traditional approach – brings the brand to the consumer to offer goods or services (through telephone calls or advertisements in different media), the inbound marketing – largely associated with the Web was – seeks to be the consumer who is Approach the brand, attracting it with quality content. Currently, the two modalities are widely used, but which is more convenient for our business?

This question is the subject of arduous debate. One of the axes of the conflict is that inbound and outbound definitions are not rigid, and certain marketing actions may fall into one or another category depending on the observer. For example, some consider as inbound all those actions performed through the Internet, and as outbound to all others. This classification, however, seems incorrect, because, for example, unwanted advertising emails are a technique of the Internet but, because of their invasive nature, could never be considered inbound .

At the same time, agencies that provide inbound marketing services often rule out the benefits of outbound marketing altogether, calling it an obsolete form because of its high cost and intrusive nature. However, the most important companies in the world continue to use this traditional approach. One of the strongest arguments in favor of inbound marketing is that it is more appropriate to the modern consumer reality. The balance of power between the company and the consumer is increasingly inclined towards the latter, which today has the information it needs to choose the product that best suits its needs (instead of what a TV ad orders it to buy) and of unpublished tools to reject abusive business practices. These include social networks (where any consumer can publicly denounce a brand) and, in our country, the Register Not Call, which only on its first day of operation had 100,000 people registered to stop receiving offers by phone. For this type of consumer,

As for cost, inbound marketing seems to be a clear winner: opening accounts on blogs or social networks is much cheaper than renting advertising space on radio, television or magazines. However, publishing quality content in those accounts – the mainstay of this model – is not as economical. Producing a valuable eBook involves hiring highly skilled copywriters, illustrators and designers; producing a podcast or a valuable video tutorial requires at least one driver and a whole crew of professional recording or recording. As the ideal is to renew these contents periodically (for example, one video per week), Sooner than later the required investment will outweigh the cost of television advertising and keeping it on the air for some time.

Naturally, if inbound marketing is to be hired by ‘cheap’ human resources, inbound marketing will be less costly, but the final product may be less satisfactory to users, to the point where their rate of return on investment is worse than that of an outbound strategy. In addition, inbound marketing software tools can be costly for small businesses. But the final product may be less satisfactory for users, to the point that their rate of return on investment is worse than that of an outbound strategy. In addition, inbound marketing software tools can be costly for small businesses. But the final product may be less satisfactory for users, to the point that their rate of return on investment is worse than that of an outbound strategy. In addition, inbound marketing software tools can be costly for small businesses.

However, inbound tactics have other advantages, not so distinguishable by the naked eye. For example, if our company is a furniture store, we can count on a blog to share decoration ideas, provide advice to furnish the home and answer user questions. With periodic and quality content, in the medium or long term we will position ourselves as a reference company within the category, and consumers will take us into account when buying furniture.

The main objective of inbound marketing is to create leads, that is, users interested in buying our products. In other words, it seeks to captivate the user enough to become a potential customer. The rest of the process aims to make that lead concrete your first purchase and finally be satisfied enough to become a regular buyer. Providing valuable content is a great way to keep the user “hooked” from the beginning to the end of that process.

But inbound marketing does not solve a fundamental problem: it is impossible for a user to become interested in our products if he does not even know us. How to get the user to know about our existence in the first place, before becoming a lead? In that sense, outbound tactics such as advertising in different media – including the Web – are indispensable for the consumer to know at least the name of our brand and, after that, is interested in what we have to offer. That is why outbound tactics should be used in combination with inbound: the first, for the user to know, and the second for the user to become a client.